Scientists discovered the worlds fastest ant - Sarkari Naukri Sms

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Saturday, October 19, 2019

Scientists discovered the worlds fastest ant

A team of German researchers discovered the world’s fastest ant, the Saharan silver ant. The researchers analyzed insects found near the remote Douz area of Tunisia. Saharan silver ant: ♦ The desert-living creature gallops over the scorching sand faster, relative to its body size than a cheetah. The ant hits speeds approaching one meter per second. It comes out at the height of the midday heat to scavenge on corpses. ♦ The ant clocked in at about 2.8 feet per second or 108 times its own body length per second. It puts the species among the world’s most nimble animals. ♦ The length of the ant lies between 4.3 and 6.8mm. ♦ It moves 1,300 mm per second. It moves with all six feet off the ground most of the time which is similar to the movement of a horse’s gallop. Before initiating the next stride, each foot contacted the ground for as little as seven milliseconds.

from Current Affairs 2019 for Competitive Exams Current Affairs Today A team of German researchers discovered the world’s fastest ant, the Saharan silver ant. The researchers analyzed insects found near the remote Douz area of Tunisia. Saharan silver ant: ♦ The desert-living creature gallops over the scorching sand faster, relative to its body size than a cheetah. The ant hits speeds approaching one meter per second. It comes out at the height of the midday heat to scavenge on corpses. ♦ The ant clocked in at about 2.8 feet per second or 108 times its own body length per second. It puts the species among the world’s most nimble animals. ♦ The length of the ant lies between 4.3 and 6.8mm. ♦ It moves 1,300 mm per second. It moves with all six feet off the ground most of the time which is similar to the movement of a horse’s gallop. Before initiating the next stride, each foot contacted the ground for as little as seven milliseconds. https://ift.tt/2pAxH1s

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